[Solved] Define a struct inside a class in C++

Can someone give me an example about how to define a new type of struct in a class in C++.

Thanks.

Solution #1:

Something like this:

class Class {
    // visibility will default to private unless you specify it
    struct Struct {
        //specify members here;
    };
};
Respondent: sharptooth

Solution #2:

declare class & nested struct probably in some header file

class C {
    // struct will be private without `public:` keyword
    struct S {
        // members will be public without `private:` keyword
        int sa;
        void func();
    };
    void func(S s);
};

if you want to separate the implementation/definition, maybe in some CPP file

void C::func(S s) {
    // implementation here
}
void C::S::func() { // <= note that you need the `full path` to the function
    // implementation here
}

if you want to inline the implementation, other answers will do fine.

Respondent: Afriza N. Arief

Solution #3:

The other answers here have demonstrated how to define structs inside of classes. There’s another way to do this, and that’s to declare the struct inside the class, but define it outside. This can be useful, for example, if the struct is decently complex and likely to be used standalone in a way that would benefit from being described in detail somewhere else.

The syntax for this is as follows:

class Container {

    ...

    struct Inner; // Declare, but not define, the struct.

    ...

};

struct Container::Inner {
   /* Define the struct here. */
};

You more commonly would see this in the context of defining nested classes rather than structs (a common example would be defining an iterator type for a collection class), but I thought for completeness it would be worth showing off here.

Respondent: templatetypedef

Solution #4:

Something like:

class Tree {

 struct node {
   int data;
   node *llink;
   node *rlink;
 };
 .....
 .....
 .....
};
Respondent: codaddict

Solution #5:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
    public:
        struct Assign
        {
            public:
                int a=10;
                float b=20.5;
            private:
                double c=30.0;
                long int d=40;
         };
         struct Assign ALT;
};

class B: public A
{
public:
    int x = 10;
private:
    float y = 20.8;
};

int main()
{
   B myobj;
   A obj;
   //cout<<myobj.a<<endl;
   //cout<<myobj.b<<endl;
   //cout<<obj.a<<endl;
   //cout<<obj.b<<endl;
   cout<<myobj.ALT.a<<endl;

    return 0;
}

    enter code here
Respondent: AKASH KUMAR GUPTA

Solution #6:

Yes you can. In c++, class and struct are kind of similar. We can define not only structure inside a class, but also a class inside one. It is called inner class.

As an example I am adding a simple Trie class.

class Trie {
private:
    struct node{
        node* alp[26];
        bool isend;
    };
    node* root;
    node* createNode(){
        node* newnode=new node();
        for(int i=0; i<26; i++){
            newnode->alp[i]=nullptr;
        }
        newnode->isend=false;
        return newnode;
    }
public:
    /** Initialize your data structure here. */
    Trie() {
        root=createNode();
    }

    /** Inserts a word into the trie. */
    void insert(string word) {
        node* head=root;
        for(int i=0; i<word.length(); i++){
            if(head->alp[int(word[i]-'a')]==nullptr){
                node* newnode=createNode();
                head->alp[int(word[i]-'a')]=newnode;
            }
            head=head->alp[int(word[i]-'a')];
        }
        head->isend=true;
    }

    /** Returns if the word is in the trie. */
    bool search(string word) {
        node* head=root;
        for(int i=0; i<word.length(); i++){
            if(head->alp[int(word[i]-'a')]==nullptr){
                return false;
            }
            head=head->alp[int(word[i]-'a')];
        }
        if(head->isend){return true;}
        return false;
    }

    /** Returns if there is any word in the trie that starts with the given prefix. */
    bool startsWith(string prefix) {
        node* head=root;
        for(int i=0; i<prefix.length(); i++){
            if(head->alp[int(prefix[i]-'a')]==nullptr){
                return false;
            }
            head=head->alp[int(prefix[i]-'a')];
        }
        return true;
    }
};

/**
 * Your Trie object will be instantiated and called as such:
 * Trie* obj = new Trie();
 * obj->insert(word);
 * bool param_2 = obj->search(word);
 * bool param_3 = obj->startsWith(prefix);
 */
Respondent: TechCat

The answers/resolutions are collected from stackoverflow, are licensed under cc by-sa 2.5 , cc by-sa 3.0 and cc by-sa 4.0 .

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