Question

[Solved] invalid types ‘int[int]’ for array subscript

This code throws up the compile error given in the title, can anyone tell me what to change?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(){

    int myArray[10][10][10];

    for (int i = 0; i <= 9; ++i){
        for (int t = 0; t <=9; ++t){            
            for (int x = 0; x <= 9; ++x){
                for (int y = 0; y <= 9; ++y){

                myArray[i][t][x][y] = i+t+x+y; //This will give each element a value

                      }
                      }
                      }
                      }

    for (int i = 0; i <= 9; ++i){
        for (int t = 0; t <=9; ++t){
            for (int x = 0; x <= 9; ++x){
                for (int y = 0; y <= 9; ++y){

                cout << myArray[i][t][x][y] << endl;

                    }
                    }
                    }                
                    }

    system("pause");

}

thanks in advance

Solution #1:

You are subscripting a three-dimensional array myArray[10][10][10] four times myArray[i][t][x][y]. You will probably need to add another dimension to your array. Also consider a container like Boost.MultiArray, though that’s probably over your head at this point.

Respondent: coppro

Solution #2:

What to change? Aside from the 3 or 4 dimensional array problem, you should get rid of the magic numbers (10 and 9).

const int DIM_SIZE = 10;
int myArray[DIM_SIZE][DIM_SIZE][DIM_SIZE];

for (int i = 0; i < DIM_SIZE; ++i){
    for (int t = 0; t < DIM_SIZE; ++t){            
        for (int x = 0; x < DIM_SIZE; ++x){
Respondent: jmucchiello

Solution #3:

int myArray[10][10][10];

should be

int myArray[10][10][10][10];
Respondent: Cadoo

Solution #4:

You’re trying to access a 3 dimensional array with 4 de-references

You only need 3 loops instead of 4, or int myArray[10][10][10][10];

Respondent: DShook

Solution #5:

Just for completeness, this error can happen also in a different situation: when you declare an array in an outer scope, but declare another variable with the same name in an inner scope, shadowing the array. Then, when you try to index the array, you are actually accessing the variable in the inner scope, which might not even be an array, or it might be an array with fewer dimensions.

Example:

int a[10];  // a global scope

void f(int a)   // a declared in local scope, overshadows a in global scope
{
  printf("%d", a[0]);  // you trying to access the array a, but actually addressing local argument a
}
Respondent: Vishal Gupta

Solution #6:

I think that you had intialized a 3d array but you are trying to access an array with 4 dimension.

Respondent: ABHISHEK YADAV

The answers/resolutions are collected from stackoverflow, are licensed under cc by-sa 2.5 , cc by-sa 3.0 and cc by-sa 4.0 .

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